indsey-graham-thinks.t1largSen. Lindsey Graham, R-South Carolina, had some biting words about Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s testimony last week on the U.S. consulate attack in Libya, saying she “got away with murder.”

Asked during an interview about Defense Secretary nominee Chuck Hagel, Graham pivoted in his answer and said he won’t vote on the nominee until questions are answered about another issue involving the State Department.

Before Hillary Clinton steps down as Secretary of State, her exit interview takes place in The Situation Room! Watch it today at 5 p.m. ET on CNN.

“I haven’t forgotten about Benghazi,” Graham said Monday night on Fox News. “Hillary Clinton got away with murder, in my view. She said they had a clear-eyed view of the threats. How could you have a clear-eyed view of the threats in Benghazi when you didn’t know about the ambassador’s cable coming back from Libya?”

Clinton sat before congressional committees last week to testify on her knowledge of the attack that left four Americans dead. While many senators on the Foreign Relations Committee carried a straight-forward tone, Republican Sen. Rand Paul and Republican Sen. Ron Johnson confronted Clinton about the lead-up to the attack and the aftermath of the violence.

Graham, who doesn’t sit on the Foreign Relations Committee, said Clinton was “very good on her feet deflecting” the questions. Should Clinton decide to run for president in 2016, Graham’s comments indicate a taste of what’s to come as far as GOP opposition to her potential White House bid.

“But she said two things that will come back to haunt her: that they had a clear-eyed assessment of the threats in Libya, and that they had close contact with the Libyan government,” he said. “I don’t believe either one of them.”

Asked in a CNN interview Tuesday why she didn’t “connect the dots” about some of the security threats that existed in Libya before the attack, Clinton said those threats were considered “manageable” by the State Department’s evaluation and security professionals.

“We have a lot of (threats) around the world. I mean there is a long list of attacks that have been foiled, assassination plots that have been prevented, so this is not some one-off event,” she said. “This is considered in an atmosphere of a lot of threats and dangers, and at the end of the day, there was a decision made that this would be evaluated but (the Consulate) would not be closed, and, unfortunately, we know what happened.”

Graham has been one of the leading senators in calling for more answers on the Libya attack. He played a major role in questioning U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice’s comments explaining the attack as a spontaneous reaction to an anti-Islam film. The intelligence community later deemed the violence as a terrorist attack.

Rice ultimately withdrew her name from consideration as Clinton’s successor to secretary of state, following repeated criticism from Republican lawmakers on Capitol Hill.

An independent report, ordered by the State Department, said it did not find “that any individual U.S. Government employee engaged in misconduct or willfully ignored his or her responsibilities” leading up to the attack. However, one State Department official resigned and three others were placed on administrative leave after the report was released in December.

– CNN’s Elise Labott and Jill Dougherty contributed to this report.