From the BBC's web page:


Britons describe hurricane ordeal
Briton Jane Wheeldon
Survivor Jane Wheeldon said UK officials gave "minimum" help
Britons returning from New Orleans have described the horrifying conditions in the city.

Many were among the thousands of people who took refuge in the Superdome stadium from the floods that engulfed the US city following Hurricane Katrina.

JENNY SACHS

Jenny Sachs, of Sheffield, told how soldiers had to smuggle her out of the Superdome in secret.

She said they had told her the lights would go out before the rescue, and warned her not to use a torch for fear of attack.

She was one of about 30 Britons who, realising they could not escape the city, fled to the stadium for shelter.


The military got us out, which we were all thankful for



"It has hit me more now I am at home, when you can have clean water, how bad it was," she said.

She said people had been raped and that others were beaten up.

"One of the soldiers did get shot and he was brought in," she said.

"A guy was brought in who had seven stab wounds and was covered in blood."

The military told all non-US citizens to stay together for safety, Ms Sachs added.

They later told them they would be secretly smuggled out in groups of 10 under cover of darkness as it had become too dangerous for them to remain in the stadium, she told BBC News.

"When we were leaving, people were going 'Where are you going?' and giving us looks.

"But the military got us out, which we were all thankful for."


I was telling people, 'Do not worry. She will be OK. She is in the best resourced, best organised country in the world. They will look after her'
Bruce Sachs

Ms Sachs' American father, Bruce, said "the extent all this fell apart so quickly" had left him "totally shocked and very embarrassed" to be a US citizen.

"At the point where the hurricane started, I was telling people, 'Do not worry. She will be OK. She is in the best resourced, best organised country in the world. They will look after her'."