Bombs and Shields

Bronx, New York, U.S. - Nearly 1/3 of all 4,600 students from DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx blocked traffic and marched almost two miles to the borough's Department of Education offices, to protest new regulations which require students to pass through metal detectors before entering the school and barred them from leaving campus during lunch. The metal detectors were installed as a way to deal with violence which is reported to be almost five percent higher at DeWitt Clinton than the citywide average. Students countered that most of the fights that occurred on school grounds happened outside where individuals would not be subject to searches.

Monday was the first day students were forced to submit to metal detector searches which caused an hour long delay. Many of the students who attended the protest said that the school was treating them like prisoners. Despite those concerns some student representatives were granted a meeting with administrators where they negotiated for a promise of more metal detectors to ease delays on entering the building. Students returned to classes with a wait and see attitude.

By JANON FISHER (NY Times)
Published: September 20, 2005

Complaining that they were being treated like inmates, some 1,500 students from DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx marched nearly two miles to the borough's Department of Education offices yesterday to protest the use of metal detectors at the school and not being allowed off campus during lunch.

The three-hour protest snarled traffic on streets between the school, on West Mosholu Parkway, and the department's offices in Fordham Plaza. No one was arrested. [Read More at Bombs and Shields]