Congratulations are in order for Adisa Banjoko, the b-boy bishop of breakbeats, not only for taking the world’s best author photo, but also for being named one of San Francisco’s 7x7 Magazine highly coveted "Hot 20 Under 40" in the October 2005 issue. According to the press release: The magazine acknowledges "The Bishop" as "The Bay Area’s foremost Hip Hop Journalist and Motivational Speaker". He was also applauded for his approach in taking Hip Hop’s educational value to juvenile hall centers and the halls of Harvard University… "This was an absolute surprise to me on every level" says Banjoko. "The most interesting thing for me was learning about how many different, smart, talented, beautiful and compassionate people work hard to make the Bay Area all that it is." The magazine came out days after Adisa returned from completing a lecture at Brown University. He addressed the Islamic Council of New England’s 20th Annual Conference, lecturing on "Islam, The West and the Question of Reform" as well as "Hip Hop and Islam: A Unique Journey". This November he will keynote at the 3rd annual H2Ed Summit. His discussion will revolve around how Hip Hop can be utilized to authentically enrich the failing American school system. This event will be held at the Bronx Museum of the Arts Nov. 5th 2005. His latest release "Lyrical Swords Vol. 2: Westside Rebellion" is due to drop November 30th 2005. It covers the social, political and spiritual trends within the Hip Hop subculture. It also investigates Hip Hop’s fascination with martial arts icon Bruce Lee and dedicates and entire chapter to the sublime relationship between Hip Hop and chess. This extraordinary relationship is also the subject of a new documentary Adisa is working on with Mike Relm, "64 Squares in the Cipher". It is currently in production and scheduled for release in 2006." Lyrical Swords Vol.2: Westside Rebellion" features interviews with some of rap world’s hardest hitting icons, such as RZA, Nas, Slick Rick, Frontline, G-Unit’s Spider Loc, Dilated Peoples and Godfather of Hip Hop Afrika Bambaataa. "I’m thankful to 7x7 Magazine and all the universities and organizations that continue to invite me to speak. My focus is, and always will be on trying to use HipHop to educate and empower at risk youth and oppressed people of all backgrounds. This is what I believe Hip Hop was created for." I like how they refer to his new book as "his latest release"! Check his website or his blog over on the side >>>>>>> And in the "news you may have missed" department: Andy "Sculpey" Brown alerted me to this from the Washington Post: It sounds like a conspiracy theory, but it isn't. The pages coming out of your color printer may contain hidden information that could be used to track you down if you ever cross the U.S. government. Actually, technically it is a conspiracy theory, it just happens to be true (That’s kind of an interesting rhetorical move, don’t you think? All "conspiracy theories" are now false? If it turns out to be true, then it’s not a conspiracy theory? When did we decide that?). ANYWAY, according to the article, most color printers now print out a secret government tracking code on every page, so that they can discover the identity of people who send various types of anonymous correspondence. Of course, like every other privacy reduction technology, they have a reason (in this case, counterfeiting), but once the system is in place, the reality is that they can do whatever they want with it. Remember that "anonymous" letter you wrote to the local paper criticizing the war in Iraq? Jokes on you, Jack! Or should I say Elbert Dinkley, Jr. of 43 Stonebrook Rd., Greenwich, CT, Social Security number 454-76-1232! What’s really disturbing about this is not so much the thing itself, but that the government was able to get all the printer companies to go along with it and not tell anyone. According to the article, this has been going on for ten years…Who knows what kind of "anti-counterfeiting" measures we will be finding out about ten years from now…